A glimpse of fishing life in Damariscotta


IMG_1558.JPGI’m in a fairly upscale pub in Damariscotta, Maine. It’s a renovated old inn with modern touches, clearly intended to draw a certain crowd. The Olympics are playing silently on a screen in a corner. I observe a couple drinking out of what seem to be the “local’s mug.” There’s about 300 of these mugs hanging from the ceiling with handwritten numbers  on their bottoms.

I ask them,”So you’re from here?” Yes they are.  “What are these mugs about?” I ask. “20 oz for 16 oz. And they never seem to end,” comments the woman. I’m trying to decide what to order so I ask, “What’s you’re favorite dish?” Caesar salad with blackened haddock. I order it.

They introduce themselves as Jim and Kathy, locals. A political ad appears on the television screen. Offhandedly, Jim comments that our government is spending money with no accountability. He’s frustrated that politicians talk reform, but never seem to make change. I agree with him, and suggest that another big issue seems be the disappearing working middle class, how so many are struggling to maintain or create a decent life for themselves and family. Kathy agrees, and mentions how people in this area have second and third jobs just to keep going.

“Where are you from?” Jim asks. I tell him I live in the Worcester area, and work in the Boston area. “Ah Worcester!” He beams. “We go down to the north end in Boston. We love it. We also go to Gloucester.”

His face darkens a bit. He asks “Have you seen The Perfect Storm?” I nod, yes I had seen the movie and read the book. “Such a story.” Then he tears up. “Those women. They waited for their men. And they helped each other.” I mention the large bronze statue in Gloucester of the mother with her two sons, looking out at the ocean. Waiting. It had moved me.

Jim nods. “It’s not like that around here. We don’t have that. People, they don’t really know each other. Or help each other.” Kathy adds, “Fishermen just go out and come back and the families do their own thing.”

So finally I ask, are you a fisherman? Jim nods again, “Yup. I used to be.” I ask him what he fished. “Lobsters in the Summer. Shrimp in the winter.”And then after more banter, he says,”Then my boat sunk. In December.”

There’s noise in the bar, and I could only hear bits of what he was saying. The story came in pieces. “I was in the water for 35 minutes.” Then,”The waves would wash over my hands, melting the ice and then refreezing.” Seconds later, “In the ambulance, I was shaking so hard I was jumping off the bed.” Finally,”I only had 2-3 more minutes before…” He looks down.

“So you never went back out after that?” I ask. “No. No, I didn’t.” Then we talk about the crazy driving in Boston, laughing about how much it scared us.

We pay our bills, and wish each other well. On my way back to my B&B, I reflect on his story, and his observations about his community. I had grown up in a town near Gloucester. I had a feel for that bonded culture of the fishing community,  in an outsider kind of way. I had thought it was common.

Filling up on Taste, Cutting Down on Waste: The Fillery, Brooklyn’s First Bulk Grocery Store


Thefillery exterior

Think of an average week of groceries. What does it look like for you? For most of us we can imagine filling a cart with a variety of different foods, each coming in their own separate packages. Cans of beans, bags of rice, and pre-packaged snacks aren’t unusual to find in a grocery haul. From one perspective a full shopping cart represents the week’s meals. This perspective can change dramatically when looking at a full cart through a waste conscious lens. How much plastic packaging has to be thrown out? How much food spoils before you’re able to eat it? Did you carry your items out in a paper or plastic bag, maybe even a reusable one? The speed and convenience of grocery stores has become a norm in our lives and unfortunately, so has the waste. While having access to a wide range of healthy and fulfilling foods does not have to go away, waste can be greatly reduced or even eliminated from the equation. The concern surrounding waste is an important one. Waste can contribute to climate change, landfills and ocean pollution, all things detrimental to every part of living ecosystems on the planet. Addressing this issue becomes increasingly important as residents of the Earth move toward more environmentally conscious lifestyles. 

With large amounts of waste generated daily it can seem like an insurmountable problem, but some innovative businesses are taking steps to change that. Meet Sarah Metz, the mind behind The Fillery, an upcoming bulk grocery store in Brooklyn New York. The store takes on a waste reducing business model, with plans to sell goods in bulk that patrons can fill their own containers with. Its focus goes beyond groceries as well, with plans to host seminars to teach community members about cooking and living healthier lifestyles. Metz’s interest in creating this sort of store stemmed from her already existing consciousness of environmental issues. She explains: 

I’ve always been an eco-conscious person, and one who loves to cook and eat healthily. These passions are only intensified by living in New York City: There is a very visible and seemingly insurmountable waste problem here, and my cooking and eating habits are inspired daily by the broad range of cultures I’m exposed to. Shopping at bulk/refill stores supports both of these interests – it allows me to try unique ingredients without having to commit to more of an item than what I actually need, thereby reducing food waste, and it eliminates unnecessary packaging. I shopped at By the Pound, a fantastic bulk store in Ann Arbor, Michigan more than 10 years ago, and there’s really nothing comparable in Brooklyn. This store certainly inspired me to start researching refill stores in other locations.

The idea for The Fillery became a reality when Metz took on the task of bringing a bulk grocery store to her area. After ten years of living there she felt that it was about time that Brooklyn had that type of store. Usthe fillery conceptual drawing-1.pnging the crowd funding platform Kickstarter, she was able to pass her originally intended goal of $15,000 dollars to start turning The Fillery into a reality. The decision to crowd fund the campaign was multifaceted. The publicity surrounding the campaign started to generate a conversation about the problem of waste as a whole, helping others see the world through this lens.

We chose to launch a campaign on Kickstarter for a few reasons: We wanted to create visibility and get a conversation going around plastic pollution, waste reduction, and the idea of creating change by offering community education and giving consumers more sustainable options. We also wanted to give members of our community a chance to be a part of the project.

-Sarah Metz

Metz’s commitment to community involvement is deep seated in her business model. In addition File Aug 01, 11 01 31 AMto being a store that empowers patrons to live waste-free lifestyles, The Fillery plans to offer cooking classes, and seminars on healthy living. Metz’s goal is to “go beyond providing people with the tools they need to live more healthily and sustainably — we want to provide community education on how to do so effectively.” The store’s values will even be reflected in its physical space. Metz explains that The Fillery will “use re-purposed and recycled materials whenever possible, and only non-toxic products which have minimal environmental impact.” It will be more than just a store, but also a place to connect with other people.

The Fillery’s deep commitment to waste reduction and community is something that showcases one of the many ways we can combat environmental degradation. When many people think of waste their thoughts go to reducing litter, making sure to recycle and keeping a compost bin. While all of these are positive steps to take in reducing waste, starting with making waste-conscious purchasing decisions gets closer to addressing the root of the problem. Stores that make it easier for consumers to make waste conscious choices help set off of a chain of waste-free business models. Metz believes that as this perspective becomes more popular it will make enabling this sort of business to succeed easier as well. This also relates to one of the challenges she has run into starting her business.

While it is our goal for The Fillery to send as little as possible to the landfill, we are learning that absolute Zero Waste for a starting business is not yet 100% feasible. There are many challenges associated with becoming a Zero Waste business, such as having to limit the vendors we work with and the products we offer to those that meet very strict packaging and shipping guidelines. Zero Waste businesses are also limited in the type of marketing materials and methods they use, which are key to the successful launch of a new business. As more business adopt zero waste strategies, these challenges will begin to disappear.

-Sarah Metz

The focus on empowering communities as well as providing them the tools they need to make positive lifestyle changes is something that resonates with our mission at Earthos. To build the jar2-1resilience in communities it requires a deep respect for its members and the ability to understand and work towards satisfying their needs. We believe that The Fillery’s mission aims to do this in a just and thorough way and we’re excited to see its development as time progresses (we might even need to pay a visit when it opens)! Combating waste and working to improve communities shows how The Fillery has a deep commitment to helping the members of its bioregion and helping us move toward a more sustainable planet. If you know of any similar stores in your bioregion or businesses working to reduce waste tell us about them! We always love learning about organizations with similar commitments to creating a more resilient planet.

The Fillery plans to launch an additional crowd funding campaign using Indiegogo which should be up sometime in the near future! For more information on The Fillery you can always find them on their website and Twitter.

Written by Earthos intern Omari Spears

Resiliency: So Close You Can Taste It

Sustainability has become a prevailing buzzword in popular culture. Businesses and products toss the word “sustainable” into descriptions (sometimes without merit) to convey environmentally-friendly practices and promises. But if the words”sustainable”  and “sustainability” were replaced by “resilient”  and “resiliency”, would people have any idea what that means?

Resiliency (as we are using it to describe an environment) speaks to an area’s ability to resiliencybounce back in the instance of an extreme event. To illustrate resiliency, I like to imagine a bioregion being like a human body. A body that is already healthy and well cared-for will have an easier time recovering from an illness or minor injury, just like an environment that is well cared-for is more likely to come back from a storm or seasonal changes. It is in our best interest to keep our bodies and bioregions healthy not only to prevent minor setbacks, but to better recover in instances of more severe damage.

farmThough often overlooked, resiliency is an essential part of a successful bioregion. An important way that we can improve resiliency and sustainability is through our food systems and agricultural practices. A region that relies heavily on imported food and goods rather than their own production is less resilient than those who are able to produce the majority of what they need. In our increasingly globalized society, we can now access goods and crops that would never have been available before (think yummy avocados- once only available in tropical/subtropical climates, they are now a favorite in many regions that rely on them to be imported). Unlike our ancestors, we no longer have to wait for a food to be in season to eat it. While it is exciting to be able to consume and use these previously unavailable foods, this makes regions like New England less resilient and more reliant on surrounding regions.

“A system that is biologically varied is endowed with the antibodies to counter dangerous organisms and restore its own equilibrium. A system based on a limited number of varieties, on the other hand, is very fragile.” -Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity

The U.S. is seeing a rise in demand for locally-grown foods. We wrote earlier about Wilson Farm of Lexington, Massachusetts and their efforts to bring fresh seasonal produce to the IMG_1719community. While it is encouraging to see farms like Wilson’s continuing to be successful, they are certainly not the norm anymore. New England as a region only produces around 10% of its own food, meaning that 90% of what we are consuming comes from outside sources. Additionally, home-grown foods tend to be more expensive than those coming from imports or industrial mega-farms, making locally grown nutrition widely inaccessible for low income families. Why purchase fresh vegetables when, for the same price, a family can buy an entire meal from a fast food restaurant? This blog seeks to explore the benefits of a more agriculturally resilient bioregion as well as highlight some Boston/New England-based organizations who are combating the growing reliance on imports and cheap foods with little nutritional value.

Earthos has been reading A New England Food Vision from Food Solutions New England. The report comments on the current state of agricultural and consumption trends in the region, and proceeds to envision a more resilient future in which New England can provide  inhabitants with nearly two-thirds of their food needs. And not just baseline needs- the report imagines having abundant resources so that everyone gets what they need and then some. Currently, 10-15% of New England’s population of 14.5 million are living without adequate nutrition due to rapidly increasing wealth inequality and poverty throughout the region. Malnutrition, lack of dietary diversity and nutrient deficiencies all lead to serious public health concerns caused by a diet that relies heavily on fats and sugars rather than  fruits and vegetables. Environmental health is at risk due to unsafe practices from industrial farming that poison our waterways and pollute the air we breathe. While it is unrealistic to expect all of our food to be grown at home, a push to increase sustainable, ethical production from local farms and make fresh produce more accessible can help us improve the resiliency of our planet and all of its inhabitants. Even so, we cannot simply clear out our forests and plant crops instead; creativity and intelligent design hold the key to developing more resilient cities and communities through agriculture.

As it turns out, Food Solutions New England is not the only one thinking that home-grown food can change human and environmental health for the better. Creative initiatives throughout the bioregion are popping up to address food security, poverty, and revisionenvironmental issues through agriculture. Take a look at the ReVision Urban Farm in Dorchester, Massachusetts. This unique business model is an urban farm, homeless shelter and job training center all in one. Their mission is to alleviate poverty in the Boston area while also equipping workers with the tools to farm and produce their own fresh, low-cost and diverse food options.

Similarly, Green City Growers sees urban farming as an opportunity to retro-fit urban centers with farms that can operate almost anywhere. Their mission is to transform unused spaces such as alleyways, vacant lots and rooftops into sustainable farming options for those communities. These gardens and small farms serve as both a practical and visual representation of how agriculture can change a city landscape and bring food production to unexpected places.

While not an urban farm, the Brookwood Community Farm in Canton and Milton, brrokwood.jpgMassachusetts is a modern take on a traditional farm. They aim to restore underutilized farmland in order to address area food insecurity while emphasizing diversity (people and crops) and education. They have a subsidized CSA for those who could not normally afford one, farm education programs, and a partnership with the Mattapan Food and Fitness Coalition.

These examples barely scratch the surface of the wealth of local organizations working to make a difference in how we produce and consume food in the bioregion. This summer, I’ve been reading a book called Blessed Unrest by Paul Hawkin. Hawkin describes the broader environmentalist movement as one made up by thousands of smaller movements coming together to make an impact overtime. Perhaps a similar movement is in the works with our food systems- thousands of small farms and individual initiatives coming together to make food accessible, nutritious, and affordable for all. Collective belief in a future with a diminished wage gap, increased agricultural production and healthier population is what will push us to invest in a more resilient food system, and therefor more resilient region as a whole.

Change does not happen overnight. I am not so bold as to say each region should rely exclusively on resources produced locally. A more resilient bioregion would greatly benefit the health of our population and environment through increased self-reliance and responsible practices. A quick look  around the bioregion reveals countless individuals and groups working to make this resiliency a reality. We as citizens, by participating in this movement, will get a taste of a more sustainable future (and some really good food!)

Wilson Farm: Sustainable Before it was Cool

For residents of Lexington, MA and beyond, Wilson’s Farm is more than a shopping destination: it is an experience.

An attempt to drive by the Wilson’s Farm parking lot during peak hours is a perfect illustration of how IMG_1709popular this local gem has become (hint- it takes a while). The Wilson family has owned and operated their business for 132 years and counting, which includes 26 acres of farmland in Lexington (and 600 additional acres in New Hampshire). The farm as a whole cultivates 125 different crops including corn, beans, squash, tomatoes, strawberries and more. My own childhood often included trips to the barn while my mother shopped so I could say hello to the pigs, chickens, goats and other animals that live at Wilson’s. Shelves lined with fresh, colorful, locally produced crops serve as evidence that the best foods are grown close to home. On top of a thriving business, events year-round keep the community engaged with the farm including haunted hayrides during Halloween and bi-weekly farm  tours during the summer.

Spotlight: Jim Wilson 

IMG_1714For Jim and his family, sustainability has been a way of life for four generations. Jim has worked on the farm for his entire life, starting before he was even old enough  to cross the street on his own. Though his role has shifted more toward the office and administration side of the business, he is still inspired daily by  the changing fields and bountiful harvests that they yield. Jim credits proximity to Boston and an ever-growing population with keeping the farm alive, especially during a time when mega-farms seem to be trumping the industry. The Wilson’s have been doing local farming since before it was “cool”, managing not only to achieve environmental sustainability but economic sustainability as well.

“I’ve known many people who are great farmers, but terrible businessmen.” -Jim Wilson

Jim has always known how to steward land to ensure that it stays productive year after year. He IMG_1719incorporates compost from his food waste for soil health, diversifies his crops, and pays close attention to daily weather patterns to fully monitor  the behavior of the farm. Without these essential practices, Wilson’s would cease to exist. Jim emphasizes that economic sustainability has been the key to the farm’s success all of these years. This mindset is what has set his farm apart from  the countless others that have unfortunately gone out of business in the Massachusetts and New England areas. By keeping the produce high quality and customers happy, Wilson’s has cultivated a sustaining business that has become deeply ingrained in  the Lexington  community.

Being part of the Wilson’s Farm team requires extraordinary hard work and drive. A day in the field is no easy task, but the workers both on the farm and in the store learn a great deal about what it means to run a successful business.

IMG_1715In addition to the physical labor involved in keeping a farm going, Jim and his team are constantly up against strict  governmental regulations and interventions that do not cater to small  businesses. Rules that are streamlined for industrial farms do not translate well to family-owned ones, making it increasingly difficult for Wilson’s to operate in the manner that they have been for decades. Nevertheless, Jim and his family have a unique tenacity that has enabled this small farm to survive in the face of big agriculture despite a less-than-accommodating market.

(To our readers: Have you seen or experienced examples in which such government regulations have been beneficial to both small and large businesses? What can be done to create more harmony between the two?)

Why do we care?

Here at Earthos, we want to highlight local businesses doing their part to improve the bioregion by aligning human and natural systems. We believe that such practices contribute to resilient and sustainable communities. Wilson’s has  worked within its ecosystem to create not just environmental sustainability, but economic and social as well. All key resources (water, people, land, energy, biodiversity, food and waste) are incorporated into this farm’s practices in innovative  ways that utilize them to their fullest potential. As local farms seem to dwindle in the shadow of highly productive mega-farms, Wilson’s has stood strong in its mission to provide its customers with nutritious food grown close to home.

Earthos is inspired by what we have seen at Wilson’s Farm. Big thank you to Jim Wilson for showing us around and sharing his experience with us- it was truly a treat to see how this local farm has impacted the community!

Written by Earthos Intern Lauren Jackson



Turning The Economy Around: How Circular Economies Can Strengthen Bioregions

How many miles did your shoes travel before they ended up on your feet? How about your shirt? Your cell phone? There is a good chance that many of you aren’t sure. Even as I type this out I don’t know where the plastic in my keyboard was sourced from, or even where my chair was manufactured. Every day we come in contact with a lot of products that have been sourced from all over the globe. This is part of how we’re able to live with some of the conveniences and luxuries that we do. I can eat an orange from Florida while living in Massachusetts, or use a table made of wood sourced from who knows where. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but if buying affordable things you knew were produced locally and produced in a sustainable way was an option would you take it? This choice is one that can become easier to make as more and more businesses move toward adoption circular models.

The idea of a circular economy is pretty simple to understand. It’s an economy that works in a loop, for the benefit of everyone in the community. Certain trades can be taught to community members which leads to the production of certain goods and products which helps to stimulate the local economy. This cycle of education and production can ultimately lead to a healthy and self sufficient community. Here at Earthos this is incredibly relevant, as it has to do with functioning on the bioregional level in a just and sustainable way. A circular economy is also a lot more than an idealistic dream for the future, it’s something that is happening now!

Something important to understand is that circular economies can take shape at different scales. A whole area can have a circular economy, or a certain part of a business can operate in a circular way, there are many different options. To better understand what a circular economy is, seeing it in action helps. An example of a closed loop operation can be found  at Dell. When a Dell computer is made some of the manufacturing process makes use of plastic from older computers. Their site explains that “Using plastics recovered from technology collected through our recycling efforts to make new plastic parts gives these plastics an extended life, has a smaller carbon footprint and reduces costs.” They also use a graphic to illustrate the closed loop recycling process. [1]

DellGraphicDell illustrates how their closed-loop recycling system turns uses materials from old computers to create new ones.

In addition to Dell other companies have similar commitments in closed loop economies. A very recent example of a circular economy on a more community level is something like the organization Carbon Tanzania that we wrote about in a previous blog post, if you missed it you can check it out here! One particularly interesting example is a company named Circle Economy who’s focus is to move the world toward closed loop economic systems. Their website explains the importance of their project:

Circularity has a key part to play not only in dramatically reducing our footprint but also in shaping a visionary and practical future for our planet. It is about becoming inspired by the biological processes of nature while  retaining value at the heart of every design, manufacturing, and consumer decision – from renewable energy and remanufacturing of used parts to the ability for reuse designed into everything we consume.[2]

Started by Andy Riley (the mind behind Earth hour), his commitment to circular economic systems shows a deep understanding of what it takes to shift mindsets in the consumer world. His faith in circular economies comes from his idea that the right sorts of people can latch onto these ideals. He also believes that circular economies are not asking too much of people, just the willingness to adopt a change. Riley explains “A longstanding problem for the sustainability movement is that it’s tended to demand we stop this or that rather than offer attractive alternatives. The circular economy, however, isn’t saying we should stop consuming, it’s saying we should start consuming differently.”[3] This request for change isn’t that far fetched. Think about all of the environmentally conscious changes that have taken place in society recently, from energy efficient light bulbs, to composting becoming mainstream or something as new as fully electric cars. All of these actions help to walk people toward more environmentally conscious lifestyles.

Another interesting component of Riley’s philosophy is that ad agencies can be a positive driving force behind the adoption of circular economies. He claims that getting on board with the circular economy “isn’t just another ‘green’ thing” it’s something that has incentives for business as well. According to McKinsey circular economies could add up to $1 trillion to the global economy by 2025. They could also help to create new jobs, up to 100,000 in as little as five years. Moving toward a circular economy helps people, the planet and the economy.[4] This monetary incentive strikes a balance between adoption circular economic models for the sake of ecology and for the sake of profit. This helps it appeal to a wider audience.

The framework of bioregional urbanism is inherently addressed in these economy types as well. Growing produce within one’s bioregion to feed its people is an example of a circular system at play in the bioregion. Even something like biodiversity acts as a demonstration of how different species’ relations can be part of a healthy and productive ecosystem. Closed loop economic systems do a good job of illustrating the parallels between economics and ecology, and the ubiquitous nature of bioregional urbanism.

-Omari Spears

Referenced Articles:


Pokemon GO: Natural Exploration or Oblivious Obsession?

If you haven’t heard of the new augmented reality app Pokemon GO, simply head to your local park. Hordes of kids, teens and downloadadults have taken to the streets to “catch ’em all” using this new interactive app that requires users  to move about their physical surroundings in order to catch Pokemon and battle other trainers. The game has taken the world by storm, and has become the object of both high praise and intense scrutiny. While many arguments exist for both sides, our blog seeks to unpack the pros and cons of using a video game to explore and experience a bioregion.

Picture this: people who once were shut inside with their gaming devices, sitting stationary for hours indoors,  are now out and about in their neighborhoods seeking new Pokemon to catch. In the short time that the game has existed, people have already begun claiming that the game has aided their mental health and that they are more active than ever before.

Earthos believes that the health and well-being of people is an essential resource for a thriving bioregion. Ideally, this game is getting people to experience the outdoors and even exercise by giving users an incentive to leave home. People are finding new, mentally and physically stimulating ways to cope with social anxiety and depression through this app. While it can be argued that players are simply glued to their phones instead of actually taking in their surroundings, we also see great potential for exploration and exposure that may not have been possible before. If playing this game is a gateway for people to begin going outside more and taking care of their minds and bodies, can the pros outweigh the cons?

Of course, we are well aware of the dangers of Pokemon GO. Users may be distracted when  they are walking around, making them prone to accidents and even trespassing . The game warns users to be alert when playing, and there have been numerous warnings about the dangers of attempting to  play while driving. These concerns are very real, and it will be interesting to see what changes are made to this (still very new) game in the coming weeks to ensure user safety.

We are also interested in this type of technology as it can be potentially used in some of our projects. For example, as we work on the Roxbury Memory Trail, we have been thinking of creating a phone app that will help people experience and understand locations on the trail. We hope that this would serve as a positive and practical application of technology in our work.

The jury is still out on whether this game is a major success or a dangerous distraction. We wholeheartedly support any effort to get people outside and into a healthy mental and physical state, as long as the effort is safe. Pokemon GO is still working out obvious glitches and pitfalls in the game, and we are anxious to see what precautions Nintendo and Niantic (the creators of the game) take to protect budding and seasoned trainers from the dangerous of the real world. For now, we applaud the players who are taking the time to explore their bioregion, and encourage them to be safe and to catch ’em all!

-Earthos Intern Team (Lauren Jackson, Omari Spears, Ellie Rochman)

Bioregional Urbanism and Youth


This week we took a big step. We expanded our work to include youth. This is important to us because youth are our future leaders. They will be dealing with increased climate issues, environmental degradation, unequal wealth, and growing populations. We believe they can generate profound solutions, in large part because they have the capacity to think differently about how we work with our planet.

What we did:
We experimented by discussing basic Bioregional Urbanism ideas with a group of teen youth in Cambridge. For each idea, we asked gave a simple explanation and then did a fun hands-on activity to illustrate the concept.
The bioregional ideas include: 1) Bioregion-your life place or life region 2) Urbanism-how we create our world, our places, our homes, our cities 3) Stewardship -understanding and caring for our 7 core resources (water, energy, food, people, biodiversity, land, waste as resource) 4) One Planet living – we have one planet, and we have to share the resources of the planet. Certain people over consume while others don’t get their fair share. How can this change together? 5) Scaled thinking-every action affects all scales from the cell, to the person, to the family, to the neighborhood, to the city, to the bioregion, to the nation, to the planet. 6) Living beings– how do we make our places, our homes, our cities with living beings at the center? 7) Co-create -we have to work together to make our life places better 8) Shared vision and goals-to work together we need shared vision, which includes all of us and is more than any of us.
What we learned: The teens quickly understood these basic principles. They actually guessed many of these ideas, including shared goals. And they remembered them the next day and used them to understand soil science. This illustrated to our team that bioregional ideas may be inherent in us, but this thinking is not supported in our contemporary education. As we work to transform our bioregions, we’re wondering how our education and professional training needs change.